Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening
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Is the world crumbling?


Displaying posts 91 - 112 of 112 in total
Thu, 06 Oct 2011 #91
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

me speak wrote:
why is it necessary to wear a mask here when the fact is that we are all alike, brother paul?

Oh, I love riddles! Is the answer - because this is a masquerade?

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Thu, 06 Oct 2011 #92
Thumb_avatar Ravi Seth India 1573 posts in this forum Offline

ganesan balachandran wrote:
No. I said welcome yogi on seeing your posts. Muad then warned us not to feed you. paul he didn't say excepting his anguish.

silly of you.even a blind man sees he is not yogi.

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Thu, 06 Oct 2011 #93
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Ravi Seth wrote:
silly of you.even a blind man sees he is not yogi.

which yogi is he not? (seriously) There have been quite a handful. Right now he is sounding like a Carter-yogi. Next week it may be another thing.

But all this only goes to prove that when one dog drops a bone there is always another mutt on the corner ready to pick it up and chew it.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Fri, 07 Oct 2011 #94
Thumb_avatar me speak Sri Lanka 392 posts in this forum Offline

Ravi Seth wrote:
silly of you.even a blind man sees he is not yogi.

brother gb's eye sight has been destroyed by vedas. me love him for that. some may ditch us but he will always be the member of 'me club'.

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Fri, 07 Oct 2011 #95
Thumb_avatar me speak Sri Lanka 392 posts in this forum Offline

Paul Davidson wrote:
But all this only goes to prove that when one dog drops a bone there is always another mutt on the corner ready to pick it up and chew it.

don't forget the 'leader' who is always ready to fight for throne/bone, brother paul.:)

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Fri, 07 Oct 2011 #96
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

me speak wrote:
don't forget the 'leader'

Now, here is a riddle for you, dear friend.

What has a big blueberry body with brains coming out the top, one eye, no nose, eight limbs . . . and is a big pain in the neck?

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Fri, 07 Oct 2011 #97
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

ganesan balachandran wrote:
His profile showed he is from the same area.

Silly Ganesan! His profile might say he is the man on the moon, but who composed that profile? But I agree, he is not Randall, and so he must be . . . . Ravi. My God, they even look so alike - two fat blueberries. And do not tell me, 'No, no, no, Ravi has only two arms and two legs whilst this other has four of each.' This can only be because . . . Ravi is standing behind his own sock-puppet!

Also, both are recommending each other!

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

This post was last updated by Paul Davidson (account deleted) Fri, 07 Oct 2011.

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Fri, 07 Oct 2011 #98
Thumb_avatar me speak Sri Lanka 392 posts in this forum Offline

Paul Davidson wrote:
so he must be . . . . Ravi.

yogi, randall, carter and now ravi...do not go mad figuring 'me' out. it would be a great tragedy for all of us if 'me club' lost its president doing such a useless research!

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Fri, 07 Oct 2011 #99
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

me speak wrote:
do not go mad figuring 'me' out

Truly I will not.

And here he paused to take a solemn vow.

"No longer will I discuss any matter with a sock-puppet."

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Fri, 07 Oct 2011 #100
Thumb_man_question_mark dhirendra singh India 2984 posts in this forum Offline

me speak wrote:
yogi, randall, carter and now ravi...do not go mad figuring 'me' out

Well, interesting guessing game.

He is not Randall, because he is not as sharp as Randall.

Not yogi, because he is not as dumb as yogi.

Not Ravi, because I feel so;).

Nick Carter, though his main concern is English grammar, but his second concern is to show mirror to others(this helps him to avoid look himself in mirror:) ).But I doubt it is he because 'me speak' is not as fast as Nick, in reply.

So It may be some other guy from other K forums.

I wonder why some few other names are being missed, like Dean Smith...

But thanks for entertainment.:)

I don't know

This post was last updated by dhirendra singh Fri, 07 Oct 2011.

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Fri, 07 Oct 2011 #101
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

And now for something completely different . . .

SOME GOOD NEWS!

Rare sea-horse colony discovered in River Thames, London.

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/rare-seahorse-found-in...
Evidence of a rare colony of seahorses has been found in the River Thames, the Environment Agency has confirmed.

Picture- Environment Agency

A short-snouted hippocampus seahorse was spotted during a routine fisheries survey at Greenwich – the first sighting of its kind. The species, which can grow up to 15cm, are rarely found in the UK.

“The seahorse we found was only 5cm long, a juvenile, suggesting that they may be breeding nearby,” said Emma Barton, Environment Agency Fisheries Officer. “This is a really good sign that seahorse populations are not only increasing, but spreading to locations where they haven’t been seen before.”

“We routinely survey the Thames at this time of year and this is a really exciting discovery,” she added. “We hope that further improvements to water quality and habitat in the Thames will encourage more of these rare species to take up residence in the river.”

Seahorses are now protected under the 1981 Wildlife and Countryside Act. The hippocampus found in the River Thames was released back into the water.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

This post was last updated by Paul Davidson (account deleted) Fri, 07 Oct 2011.

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Fri, 07 Oct 2011 #102
Thumb_man_question_mark dhirendra singh India 2984 posts in this forum Offline

Paul Davidson wrote:
Rare sea-horse colony discovered in River Thames, London.

Thanks Paul, for providing everything at one place, like modern shopping Malls.:)

I don't know

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Fri, 07 Oct 2011 #103
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

dhirendra singh wrote:
Thanks Paul, for providing everything at one place, like modern shopping Malls.

Ya, but no check-out. All is given freely.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Sat, 08 Oct 2011 #104
Thumb_tampura ganesan balachandran India 2204 posts in this forum Offline

me speak wrote:
brother gb's eye sight has been destroyed by vedas. me love him for that.

Really, kindly please have a look Friedrich's news letter the article What Has Happened to this Ancient Culture? and help me see better.

We are watching, not waiting, not expecting anything to happen but watching without end. JK

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Mon, 10 Oct 2011 #105
Thumb_tampura ganesan balachandran India 2204 posts in this forum Offline

So what shall we do when an ancient race, with three to five thousand years of a certain culture, the Brahmanical culture, is wiped out overnight? Don’t get upset about my using that word. You are all probably anti-Brahmin, pro-Brahmin, or whatever it is. The Brahmanical culture of three to five thousand years, however bad or good, has made a strong imprint on the Indian brain, on its culture, on its books, everything. And overnight it is gone. You understand? It is gone; why? We must ask this very serious question of why a certain culture lasting for thousands of years, which has had such a strong imprint, strong impression on the human brain, has been wiped out. Now it is the fashion in this country to smoke, to drink, to eat meat. I am not pro- or anti-Brahmin, but I am saying these are facts.
And what has happened to that culture, whether it is good or bad? Was it just a veneer, a surface, like a coat that you put on and throw off?

probably if we have a clear vision to see this problem we can prevent this world from crumbling.
gb

We are watching, not waiting, not expecting anything to happen but watching without end. JK

This post was last updated by ganesan balachandran Mon, 10 Oct 2011.

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Mon, 10 Oct 2011 #106
Thumb_deleted_user_med Muad dhib Ireland 175 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

All is clear , some programs in the brain are frightened, so we say.
In fact they are not frightened ,sometimes they have no clue but their set up implies an answer , so when there is no answer instead of recognizing " I don't know" the insufficient program invent any answer to be happy ????? with it ! does it work ? absolutely not ...this for me say most of our behaviour , quite simple indeed.

The programs I mention they are just totally insufficient to deal with EVERYTHING which is in a wholly life ...it is like if I am using a screw driver to cut my wood for the winter , it does not work..
So the screw driver if it behaves like we do is going to imagine it can cut wood , then the all life is only about a screw driver willing to cut wood...

We are kind of totally stuck in such a stupid paradox , the image is poor but for me says enough...

What has it to see with Brahmanism culture ? I guess this culture understood the paradox of the screw driver :)

Dan.....

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Mon, 10 Oct 2011 #107
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Ganesan, the ancient culture crumbled long ago.

For more than two thousand years, Indian society has been living off the crumbs that fell from a table existing in far distant past. The crumbs became traditions, bereft of their original symbolic meanings.

In ancient times the title 'Brahmin' signified a mark of high realisation. Someone who had 'realised god' was a Brahmin. But as the meaning deteriorated it degenerated into a priestly caste and eventually sank even lower into inherited, social caste and finally a racial caste system.

This has gone on for thousands of years. The culture that has suddenly gone overnight, was a culture of crumbs, castes and hypocrisy: a veneer that no longer held out against the modern age with its glaring new hypocrisies.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Mon, 10 Oct 2011 #108
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Interesting news today, scientists say they have discovered the reason for an apparent recent spell of hot summers and cold winters. The volatility is not caused by global warming but by the diminution of solar radiation. The sun's activity rises and falls in 11 year waves and we have been in a downward wave.

The BBC reported that this finding has nothing to do with global warming, which, they said, has other causes.

Elsewhere, meteorological scientists study another solar phenomenon, that of solar flares which, they say, contribute as the major factor in global warming patterns.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Mon, 10 Oct 2011 #109
Thumb_tampura ganesan balachandran India 2204 posts in this forum Offline

ganesan balachandran wrote:
The Brahmanical culture of three to five thousand years, however bad or good, has made a strong imprint on the Indian brain, on its culture, on its books, everything. And overnight it is gone.

JK means the vedic culture, the brahmanical culture is of recent origin. in fact there is no word as brahman in vedas . Brahmin is different.
gb

Moad has understood the significance of the above excerpts.

Paul Davidson wrote:
Ganesan, the ancient culture crumbled long ago.

That is what how did it happen.

We are watching, not waiting, not expecting anything to happen but watching without end. JK

This post was last updated by ganesan balachandran Mon, 10 Oct 2011.

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Mon, 10 Oct 2011 #110
Thumb_tampura ganesan balachandran India 2204 posts in this forum Offline

Paul Davidson wrote:
In ancient times the title 'Brahmin' signified a mark of high realisation.

Now those who are inspired with JK. vedas say the face of god became brahmin .Others will obviously follow.
gb

We are watching, not waiting, not expecting anything to happen but watching without end. JK

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Mon, 10 Oct 2011 #111
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Britain Faces A Mini Age-Age (Daily Express Banner Headline)

Monday October 10,2011
By Laura Caroe

BRITAIN is set to suffer a mini ice age that could last for decades and bring with it a series of bitterly cold winters.

And it could all begin within weeks as experts said last night that the mercury may soon plunge below the record -20C endured last year.

Scientists say the anticipated cold blast will be due to the return of a disruptive weather pattern called La Nina. Latest evidence shows La Nina, linked to extreme winter weather in America and with a knock-on effect on Britain, is in force and will gradually strengthen as the year ends.

The climate phenomenon, characterised by unusually cold ocean temperatures in the Pacific, was linked to our icy winter last year – one of the coldest on record.
And it coincides with research from the Met Office indicating the nation could be facing a repeat of the “little ice age” that gripped the country 300 years ago, causing decades of harsh winters.

The prediction, to be published in Nature magazine, is based on observations of a slight fall in the sun’s emissions of ultraviolet radiation, which may, over a long period, trigger Arctic conditions for many years.

Although a connection between La Nina and conditions in Europe is scientifically uncertain, ministers have warned transport organisations and emergency services not to take any chances. Forecasts suggest the country could be shivering in a big freeze as severe and sustained as last winter from as early as the end of this month.

La Nina, which occurs every three to five years, has a powerful effect on weather thousands of miles away by influencing an intense upper air current that helps create low pressure fronts.

Another factor that can affect Europe is the amount of ice in the Arctic and sea temperatures closer to home.
Ian Currie, of the Meterological Society, said: “All the world’s weather systems are connected. What is going on now in the Pacific can have repercussions later around the world.”

Parts of the country already saw the first snowfalls of the winter last week, dumping two inches on the Cairngorms in Scotland. And forecaster James Madden, from Exacta Weather, warned we are facing a “severely cold and snowy winter”.

Councils say they are fully prepared having stockpiled thousands of tons of extra grit. And the Local Government Association says it had more salt available at the beginning of this month than the total used last winter.

But the mountain of salt could be dug into very soon amid widespread heavy snow as early as the start of next month. Last winter, the Met Office was heavily criticised after predicting a mild winter, only to see the country grind to a halt amid hazardous driving conditions in temperatures as low as -20C.

Peter Box, the Local Government Association’s economy and transport spokesman, said: “Local authorities have been hard at work making preparations for this winter and keeping the roads open will be our number one priority.”

The National Grid will this week release its forecast for winter energy use based on long-range weather forecasts.

Such forecasting is, however, notoriously difficult, especially for the UK, which is subject to a wide range of competing climatic forces.

A Met Office spokesman said that although La Nina was recurring, the temperatures in the equatorial Pacific were so far only 1C below normal, compared with a drop of 2C at the same time last year.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Mon, 10 Oct 2011 #112
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Minister Makes Big Freeze Pledges - Northern Ireland (Associated Press)

October 10 2011

Problems experienced during last year's big freeze should not recur this winter, Social Development Minister Nelson McCausland has said.
Thousands of houses were damaged during a thaw which followed last winter's severe weather, many by flooding following burst pipes.

The bill for the Housing Executive, which is responsible for social housing across Northern Ireland, was estimated at around £10 million.
Mr McCausland, who is responsible for the Housing Executive, told the Assembly on Monday: "I believe we have learned the lessons from that period of severe weather last year and I have ensured that social landlords have in place effective emergency and continuity planning arrangements that are fit for purpose.

"Tenants must not have to go through a repeat of the problems that occurred last year.

"Following in-depth reviews of all that happened and the subsequent revisions to the emergency planning arrangements, I believe that the measures now in place should ensure that all relevant agencies are fully prepared should we experience another severe winter and that tenants will receive the services they are entitled too."

Sinn Fein had criticised former social development minister Alex Attwood for not acting quickly enough to help people whose homes were damaged.

Stewart Cuddy, chief executive of the 90,000-property Housing Executive, said it had placed 30,000 orders for repairs with contractors.

Mr McCausland added: "I also want to ensure that social homes are energy efficient and, in order to assist tenants in heating their homes effectively, I am working with the Housing Executive to develop a programme that will see all properties double-glazed as soon as possible.

"In the interim, I have already bid for additional funding in the October monitoring round to enable the Housing Executive to replace single-glazed windows with double glazing and additional insulation measures to tackle the thermal efficiency of individual homes."

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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