Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening
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Therapeutic Work With the Present Moment


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Wed, 13 Mar 2013 #1
Thumb_mandala6 Ruth Bass United States 121 posts in this forum Offline

In a therapist training program, not only are there a variety of theories from which to choose, but also a number of different ways to meditate. In the existential therapeutic model, the therapist's responsibility is to shine a light on to the "present moment" for the client. In doing so the therapist brings the client's attention to "immediacy" or "actuality". It has been said that one can live more fully by attending the present moment in daily life, if once freed from thought of the future or the past (psychological time). Will meditation facilitate a longer duration of attention to the present moment with increased respites from thought?

"It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society." J. Krishnamurti

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Wed, 13 Mar 2013 #2
Thumb_stringio Arthur Landon United States 146 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Ruth Bass wrote:
Will meditation facilitate a longer duration of attention to the present moment with increased respites from thought?

Seeing as how there is nothing but the eternal present, to whatever thought, image, or sensation attention limits itself, it is always present, if not always accounted for. There's no such thing as "a longer duration of attention to the present moment" because there is nothing but the present moment, regardless of where attention may turn. As for "increased respites of thought", you can't know when you're not thinking because knowing involves thought. All you can do is be mindful of where attention is going.

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Thu, 14 Mar 2013 #3
Thumb_img_0244 Jack Pine United States 5800 posts in this forum Offline

Ruth Bass wrote:
In a therapist training program, not only are there a variety of theories from which to choose, but also a number of different ways to meditate.

If one knows what is right is there a need to choose?

Ruth Bass wrote:
In the existential therapeutic model, the therapist's responsibility is to shine a light on to the "present moment" for the client.

Does the therapist know what the present moment is and if he does can he "shine a light on it" for another?

Ruth Bass wrote:
In doing so the therapist brings the client's attention to "immediacy" or "actuality".

Again, can the therapist bring his own mind to 'immediacy' or 'actuality'? And if they can is it possible to show that to another? Do you, Ruth, know what is 'immediate' or 'actual'?

Ruth Bass wrote:
Will meditation facilitate a longer duration of attention to the present moment with increased respites from thought?

Is meditation seperate from the present moment. Can meditation as K spoke of it occur at any time but in the present? The present moment is timeless by definition so how can it be prolonged?

This post was last updated by Jack Pine Thu, 14 Mar 2013.

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Thu, 14 Mar 2013 #4
Thumb_snapshot_20130606 john Campbell Canada 535 posts in this forum Offline

Ruth Bass wrote:
therapist training

Ruth Bass wrote:
In a therapist training program, not only are there a variety of theories from which to choose, but also a number of different ways to meditate.

J.C.> Very interesting to have such variety of ideas and approaches . Are you training?

Ruth Bass wrote:
In the existential therapeutic model, the therapist's responsibility is to shine a light on to the "present moment" for the client.

J.C.> Are you meaning a wider ‘beam’ on the present circumstances? Existentially speaking.

Ruth Bass wrote:
Will meditation facilitate a longer duration of attention to the present moment with increased respites from thought?

J.C.>Yes,it should extend the(meditative) moment for whatever time is necessary ,thought to be dealt with at a later point.

Assuming that thought is to be dealt with.

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